Monthly Archives: October 2013

Journaling

#2 Most best-est daily personal growth activity

You can do it alone. And you save tons on therapy.

Keep a diary.

It’s something I request that all my clients do.

I grew up Mormon. And say what you will about Mormons, but they encourage journaling. So I did. Thousands of pages from the age of 14. Not only did it help me improve my writing skills dramatically, (my 9th grade English teacher accused me of plagiarizing Alistair Cooke), but keeping a journal helped me deal emotionally with some of the crazymaking in my family. Once I was older, it allowed me to see unhealthy patterns I was living. Once I saw them, I could let them go.

Why else is keeping a journal or diary helpful?

Writing down the day’s events forces you to slow down. It forces you to take time out that you wouldn’t normally take. Not to ‘do’. But to ‘look at doing’. We keep busy. Watching and interacting with a big wide world and lots of people, digitally and otherwise.

What don’t we look at?

Ourselves. Writing about our feelings and experiences allows us to turn the camera inward and see the one thing we usually ignore the most: us.

Doing that makes us more conscious about what happened and our reaction to it.

While writing, we may be triggered, but we are not in the events. So we can more easily (if imperfectly) step outside ourselves and evaluate what really happened.

Does our reaction to the event seem too big? Too small? What would I think and feel if someone else told me the story I am writing?

And what if something is not happening we want?

Sometimes we are not acting because of fears we don’t even realize we have. Writing about our so-called ‘laziness and procrastination’ helps us empathize with the parts of ourselves that have fear about taking action. Taking that extra step back helps us drop our judgement and, if necessary, to ask for more help if we need.

And, even scientists agree:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1146033/Keeping-diary-good-puts-things-perspective-says-scientists.html

Exorcism under Hypnosis

For some reason, an exorcism is dramatically easier to perform under the influence of hypnosis.

The story:

I was working with someone hypnotically and every time I would hypnotize them, I would get different stories about ‘who they were’.

She would jump into an age…usually 3 or 8…sometimes 13 and 14, and tell a story that was complete nonsense. She was a girl from a story, living that story, talking about the family.

Anyway, after hacking away at these stories rather uselessly, putting the children protagonists ‘to bed’ mentally, It appeared.

And it has a name and was not happy to be found.

“Fuck you.” it was fond of saying.

“Get out,” I said.

Eventually it did, waking her up cussing and shaking uncontrollably at the same time.

But it was gone.

This is my second ‘exorcism’ using hypnosis.

And, to contrast it with multiple exorcisms without hypnosis, these are much, much simpler.

Why?

I am not sure. Under hypnosis, you have conscious and deeper consent to work with the client. The resistances are largely out of the way, so that you are talking to the ‘entity’ much more directly and easily than otherwise.

Highly recommended.